The Chippewa tribe wants to build a casino complex in Michigan

The tribe from Sault Ste. Marie, paid US$179,000 for the land in 2010.
The tribe from Sault Ste. Marie, paid US$179,000 for the land in 2010.

The 71 acres of land acquired by the tribe, includes the site of an abandoned church and a racetrack.

US.- The Chippewa tribe filed an application to obtain a casino license from Michigan’s federal authorities with the aim of building a casino complex not far from the Detroit Metro Airport. The land the tribe acquired, includes the site of a former church and the former Pinnacle Race Course.

According to tribal officials, the development will feature a 70,000-square-foot building, but the place will host not only the casino, but also health and educational centres intended for members of the tribe.

Although tribal casinos in the state are exempt from any taxes, the Sault Tribe of Chippewa Indians promised they will share 0.5 percent of its slot machines winnings with the township, as well as paying property taxes once the casino is operational. The township reciprocated by agreeing not to block the development and by promising to send a letter to the U.S. Department of Interior showing its support if needed.