Damian Collins to remain responsible for gambling in new UK government

Collins was appointed to the position in July.
Collins was appointed to the position in July.

The DCMS has confirmed that Damian Collins will remain in his position as parliamentary under-secretary for tech and the digital economy.

UK.- The UK government’s Department of Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) has confirmed that Damian Collins will remain responsible for the gambling remit, including the long-delayed Gambling Act review. He will remain in position as parliamentary under-secretary for tech and the digital economy.

Collins was appointed to the role on July 8 after Chris Philp resigned in protest at Boris Johnson’s leadership. With Liz Truss now prime minister and Michelle Donelan having replaced Nadine Dorries at the helm of the DCMS, it had been unclear who would lead the gambling review, which was said to be all but complete before Johnson resigned.

The Betting and Gaming Council (BGC) tweeted: “Many congratulations to Damian Collins who continues his vital role at DCMS – this appointment is thoroughly deserved and we wish the minister every success.”

Collins has been the member of parliament for Folkestone and Hythe since 2010. He chairs the joint committee on the draft online safety bill. He’s the fourth minister to lead the review of gambling legislation since it began, with Philp having come after John Wittingdale and Nigel Huddleston.

A gambling white paper is still expected in the coming months, but speculation is brewing that the UK government may completely scrap its long-delayed overhaul of gambling legislation. Truss is said to favour ditching plans for new regulation in a range of areas in order to focus on economic growth.

The Guardian has suggested that any new legislation based on the two-year review could be scrapped completely. The newspaper’s chief political correspondent, Jessica Elgot, has reported that Truss wants to axe the animal welfare bill, the energy bill, the online harms bill and reforms of gambling legislation.

The PM has already signalled plans to scrap the bill of rights, the government’s obesity strategy and the cap on bankers’ bonuses, so it stands to reason that other planned reforms could face the chop.

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