Supreme Court to rule on video-lottery terminals in Canada

The Supreme Court will rule on whether a case can move on against video-lottery terminals in Canada.
The Supreme Court will rule on whether a case can move on against video-lottery terminals in Canada.

A court case against video-lottery terminals in Canada may continue should the Supreme Court decides if and how it may.

Canada.- The Supreme Court will decide whether a case against video-lottery terminals (VLTs) can proceed. They will decide whether a groundbreaking court case may continue and on what grounds.

A class action introduced against VLTS says they’re inherently deceptive, addictive and illegal under the Criminal Code. That’s why the High Court will combine two challenges, in accordance with decisions by the Newfoundland and Labrador Court of Appeal.

The action combines 30,000 people in both cities that paid the Atlantic Lottery Corp to gamble on video-lottery terminals in Canada. The period covered starts from April 2006 and the outcome may change how the segment works in the country.

Douglas Babstock and Fred Small are the lead plaintiffs in the case the Supreme Court will review. They seek damages equal to the alleged unlawful gain the lottery corporation gained from VLT revenue.

However, the company assures the highly regulated electronic games are decided only by chance.

The High Court hasn’t set a hearing date, but will confirm it in the next few weeks.

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