Ohio fines Jack Ent over security issues

ohio fines jack ent

Credits: Destination Cleveland

The local control commission fined the company over security and computer issues.

US.- The Ohio Casino Control Commission imposed a fine os US$200k to Jack Entertainment for allowing underage patrons into the Cleveland casino and allowing unauthorised employees access to the management program for the Cleveland and Cincinnati casinos, cleveland.com reported.

Matt Cullen, Jack chief executive officer said in a statement after the settlement agreement approved yesterday afternoon: “We acknowledge the significance of the matters identified by the Ohio Casino Control Commission and take our compliance with their important operational policies and procedures seriously. We have swiftly taken steps to respond to these issues and will continue to work with the Commission to ensure ongoing compliance.”

The issues reportedly happened last year after Jack Entertainment took over the ownership of the gambling facilities from Caesar’s Entertainment Corp, as the Ohio commission spokeswoman Jessica Franks revealed. “We found a number of cases where underaged individiuals were allowed on the property,” she added.

“We get that you will never have 100 percent compliance in keeping out minors and the Cleveland casino has unique features. But we found that basically the security personnel were not following procedures that are supposed to be followed to screen out individuals,” said Franks. The issue came to light after the casino informed the control commission of these patterns, as they’re legally obliged to let them be known. From June to November 2016, there were at least 13 instances where underage patrons were found, the news outlet revealed. In December, the casino hired a security training instructor for all employees in order to overturn the situation.

“They kept telling us it was fixed and our auditors found it wasn’t. As part of the settlement agreement, Jack is going to hire an independent third party to do a special audit of the computer management program to make sure it is in compliance,” said the spokeswoman. “Sanctions are typically our last resort.”

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