NJ adopts new rules for fantasy sports

The new rules require fantasy sports operators to adopt procedures to ensure that no one under the age of 18 participates in DFS.

The Division of Consumer Affairs from New Jersey has announced that the new fantasy sports rules address operator fees and protection for minors.

US.- The Division of Consumer Affairs of New Jersey and the Attorney General Gurbir S. Grewal announced this week that the state adopted its first set of rules for fantasy sports activities. These rules were designed to protect children.

The Division informed that the new rules implement a 2017 law that required fantasy sports operator to obtain permits from the authority and comply with other requirements to protect participants in New Jersey’s online sports betting segment.

The new rules require fantasy sports operators to adopt procedures to ensure that no one under the age of 18 participates in fantasy sports activities. Fantasy sports operators also are prohibited from advertising in publications or media aimed exclusively at minors, at K-12 schools and at sports venues used exclusively for K-12 student sports activities.

Fantasy sports operators also must offer individuals the ability to restrict themselves from participating in fantasy sports activities if they so choose. Other consumer protections in the new rules include a requirement that fantasy sports operators maintain adequate procedures for processing complaints from participants, and restrictions on participation by employees, officers, directors, and owners of fantasy sports operators.

NJ regulator warns advertisers

The Division of Gaming Enforcement (DGE), has issued a warning to media outlets to urge them to stop accepting advertisement from unlicensed operators.

David Rebuck, director of the DGE, wrote an open letter to the news outlets in which he shared his concern about consumer protection measures and the lack of them. He said that not having such protections in place put players’ safety at risk.

Rebuck asked the outlets to only advertise operators licensed in the country and didn’t make reference to them being located in New Jersey. He said that if illegal sites are promoted, they should specify that they do not hold a proper licence to operate in the state.

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