“I can only see the industry continuing to grow”

Football

Andrew McCarron, SBC Managing Director.

(Exclusive interview).- Andrew McCarron talked with Focus Gaming News about the upcoming  Betting on Football 2017 and the industry itself.

Sports betting is gaining momentum and Betting on Football is proof that the industry keeps growing all around the world. SBC Managing Director Andrew McCarron assessed the market’s situation and previewed the conference that will start next May 3rd at Stamford Bridge.

This year’s event is expected to see the double of attendees, from 400 last year to over 800 people for the conference. Why do you think that Betting on Football has grown significantly in just one year?

Word of mouth has played a major role following last year’s event and we’ve also learned a lot from our first two-day conference last September – Betting on Sports – which had 600 attendees.

We knew the growth was there and we are thrilled that so many have bought tickets for Betting on Football. We feel that we have really found a gap in the market in the betting and gaming industry event calendar. It’s a conference that has real value for people.

Do you think that the exponential increase in both attendees and speakers is related to how much the sports betting industry has reached multiple markets in a short period of time?

Sports betting continues to grow massively all over the world. It’s a vibrant, progressive industry and is a simple proposition. It is huge even in markets where it is not regulated.

The global reach of the English Premier League is a big factor. Operators in local markets are keen to be associated with these global sporting brands. I can only see the industry continuing to grow.

By covering topics such as self-regulation, match-fixing and managing risk, among other things, Betting on Football raises awareness about the side that needs to be taken care of for the industry to be fully successful. What other goals did you set for this year’s event? What are the main objectives of the conference?

We just want a forum where you can have sensible discussions about betting and sport without the histrionics that can come from the wider media. Betting is an interesting, complex and fun industry, which deserves attention.

The very DNA of Sports Betting Community (SBC) is networking and that forms a huge part of Betting on Football. People come to the show to meet people and we facilitate that in lots of different ways.

We are hosting parties, have created an event app and also have a Game Zone and Networking Café, so you can be sure attending Betting on Football will add plenty new names to your contacts book.

Sports betting continues to grow massively all over the world. It’s a vibrant, progressive industry and is a simple proposition. It is huge even in markets where it is not regulated.

How do you assess the current situation of sports betting in North America? Do you think that market needs a better leadership in order to reach Europe’s industry level?

We will be dealing with this on the North America Panel. We also have a private meeting on the second day, led by Matthew Cullen, CEO of San Manuel Digital, discussing a new political coalition and lobby group (US Sports Integrity Alliance).

This aims to pull the US Gaming stakeholders and European industry together in order to put the case for sports betting legislation to the powers that be in the USA.

Of course the US news agenda changes from day to day at the moment with the current Commander-in-Chief, but there are a growing number of people asking what potential there is for sports betting to be legalised on a state or even federal level.

Donald Trump has indicated some support for it before, but it’s hard to know just how excited the industry should be getting about the prospect at the moment.

The very DNA of Sports Betting Community (SBC) is networking and that forms a huge part of Betting on Football. People come to the show to meet people and we facilitate that in lots of different ways.

Betting on Football’s panels always include a variety of exhibitors and speakers that contribute to the dynamic of the conference. Is there a specific process that organisers go through in order to create a good line-up?

We don’t have a set formula. Some panels are created when we find which interesting people are attending and we have a chat around what areas they are particularly keen to speak about.

Some panels can be trends related, while some are more news focus as we need to stick with what the agenda is at that moment in time.

It’s also important to keep suppliers as part of conversation, as they’re a vital part of the lifeblood. A lot of innovation is driven by the supplier side, so they also form a big part of the show.